About Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

About Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy

This page contains basic answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs) about CBT.

What is Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)?

Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is the most influential modern evidence-based psychological therapy.  It developed out of the combination of earlier behaviour therapy and cognitive therapy approaches in the 1970s.  The word “cognitive” comes from the Latin word for knowledge, and simply refers to your thoughts and beliefs.  Cognitive-behavioural therefore means “to do with thought and action.”  All forms of psychological therapy attempt to help people overcome distressing emotions such as anxiety and depression.  CBT attempts to help you cope with or change feelings (emotions) by first changing thoughts (cognition) and actions (behaviour).  The NHS Choices website, which provides information for the public, has a section dedicated to CBT, containing videos and other resources.

What is CBT used for?

CBT can be used for many different problems.  In several areas, CBT has a wealth of scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness, and it has often been found superior to other forms of therapy.  CBT is particularly effective in the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related problems.  Solutions, the London Cognitive Therapy Centre, specialises in the treatment of anxiety-related problems such as social anxiety (e.g., public speaking), phobias, stress, etc.

Why use CBT?

CBT is widely used in the NHS and by health insurance companies because it has such a strong body of evidence supporting its effectiveness.  CBT takes fewer sessions than most traditional psychological therapies.  It also approaches things from a more pragmatic and “common sense” perspective, with an emphasis on practical problem-solving.

How do I know if I’m suitable?

Your initial appointment will be a standard assessment session during which you’re suitability for CBT will be evaluated, and your problems assessed.  Your therapist will also begin to formulate a description of your problems and a provisional plan of treatment.  However, if you want to telephone or email us with any questions, we can often give basic advice, free of charge, before you book an appointment.  If CBT doesn’t appear suitable or another treatment may be preferable, we will inform you and you will be under no obligation to continue treatment.

How many sessions will it take?

The number of sessions required varies depending on the type of problem.  However, our clinic specialise in brief and short-term work, usually ranging from 6-20 sessions in typical cases.  Your initial consultation and assessment session is used to arrive at a more specific estimate of the number of sessions recommended.

How do I book an appointment?

See our fees section or clinic location if you need more information.  Otherwise, just contact us with any remaining questions or to book an initial appointment.

Blog Articles About Cognitive Therapy

  • How Fragile is Worry? October 31, 2012
    This short article lists a wide variety of brief cognitive-behavioural experiments that can be used to change your experience of worrying and to alter unhelpful attitudes toward it. The post How Fragile is Worry? appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Worksheet: Re-evaluating Coping Behaviour August 28, 2012
    Worksheet: Re-evaluating Coping Behaviour Copyright © Donald Robertson, 2012.  All rights reserved. These questions are designed to help you re-evaluate and perhaps challenge your existing ways of coping when anxious, or dealing with similar problems.  Feel free to skip questions … Continue reading → The post Worksheet: Re-evaluating Coping Behaviour appeare
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • CBT for Intolerance of Uncertainty and Chronic Worry June 18, 2012
    Recent advances in the cognitive therapy of generalised anxiety disorder have focused on the role "intolerance of uncertainty" plays in triggering and maintaining chronic worry, this article provides a brief outline of the approach. The post CBT for Intolerance of Uncertainty and Chronic Worry appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in Lond
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Stoicism and CBT May 13, 2012
    These are my notes from a recent talk given as part of a panel speaking to the London Philosophy Club, on the philosophical origins of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The post Stoicism and CBT appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Four Books by Donald Robertson May 3, 2012
    Brief description of four recent books by Donald Robertson on hypnosis, CBT, and philosophy. The post Four Books by Donald Robertson appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Stoic Philosophy & Resilience-Building April 12, 2012
    Stoicism and psychological resilience-building are discussed in relation to modern cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in this new self-help book on resilience, part of the popular Teach Yourself series. The post Stoic Philosophy & Resilience-Building appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • What your therapist didn’t tell you… April 7, 2012
    This brief article explores some well-established facts about psychological therapy that clients may not be familiar with. The post What your therapist didn’t tell you… appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • What not to Think: The Distortion-Spotting Exercise April 1, 2012
    This short article describes an exercise for reflecting upon and identifying potential "thinking errors" using cognitive therapy. The post What not to Think: The Distortion-Spotting Exercise appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) February 21, 2012
    This brief article outlines the definition of psychologically flexible and inflexible styles of responding in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). The post Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Clinical Supervision February 2, 2012
    Brief article with some notes about clinical supervision for psychotherapists, counsellors and hypnotherapists. The post Clinical Supervision appeared first on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy in London.
    Solutions: London Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

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